Video: Live Reading at tenx9 Nashville

If you have 10 minutes, take a look at this video from the live storytelling event at Jackelope Brewing Co. on June 20. What an exciting event it was! There were about 100 people in the audience (standing room only!), and I was in the company of 8 other talented writers presenting their stories about “Home.” I hope you enjoy listening to my short story, “Have You Come to Take Me Home?” and be sure to sign up for my email list to hear more about upcoming events and giveaways!


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Phyllis Gobbell live story reading with Tenx9 Nashville at Jackalope Brewing Company

Event: Live Story Reading

I’m so excited to announce that I’ll be doing a live story reading with Tenx9 Nashville on June 20 at 6:30 pm! The event features nine Nashville writers who each read one ten-minute story focused on the theme “Home.” It’s such a joy to be able to attend events in-person again. How fitting that the Nashville live story reading will be held at Jackalope Brewing Company, a local favorite!

The address for Jackalope Brewing Company is 429B Houston St, Nashville TN 37203. I hope to see you there!


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Everyday Monsters podcast title graphic

Everyday Monsters Podcast

That’s right: I’m in a podcast!

If you love scary stories then you’ll love the Everyday Monsters horror podcast hosted by Donnie Lansdale, experienced voice actor and podcast host. Each episode features a spooky story written by a guest author, many of them award-winning, and I’m one of them! My story “What the Cat Knew” appears in episode two on Spotify.

Watch this trailer for a peek at the Everyday Monsters podcast, and be sure to give Donnie a follow to keep up with new episodes. Also, let me know what you think of the story in the comments below. I love to hear your thoughts!

A Crepe Paper Memory

We never had much, on our small Tennessee farm, tucked away in almost Alabama. But the crepe paper dress is a reminder that there was no needle my mother would not try to thread for me.  

The second grade school play was coming up, and I was cast as Little Bo-Peep. Excited as I was to have the part, I am sure now that when my mother read the note from school, what I saw in her eyes was worry. Worry that we couldn’t afford the material to make the costume. No velvet. No satin. Not even cotton for a dress I’d wear just once.

But after a while, we went to town and bought crepe paper.

My mother made all of my clothes. Homemade was the best she could afford. She’d see a dress in the Sears catalog or in a store window in Florence, Alabama, and say, “I can make it.”  From school clothes to formals, my mother had a gift for making something out of nothing. I was much older before I understood what a luxury it was to have my own personal seamstress through all my growing-up years.

All those creations exist only in memory now, except for one. The crepe paper dress.

I could not imagine how she would ever turn paper—the kind used for wrapping a present or decorating for a party—into a dream I could wear.

But my mother was an artist.

I can see it all, still. With pinking shears in hand, she cut crisp patterns out of newspaper and spread them on the dining room table. Leaning forward, she guided the crepe paper under the Singer’s clacking needle, treadle whirring softly, like a song. Late into the night, she bent over her needlework, straight pins clamped between her teeth, her fingers slip-stitching the hem of the nearly-finished costume. All of it, fashioning from thread and paper and love, not just a dress for the play, but a crepe paper memory that has endured for decades. 

Every woman has had forgettable dresses, expensive brand names that have come and gone. My mother is gone now, too. But I can still remember the feel of the crepe paper on my little girl shoulders. Sometimes I still get the urge to look at the dress, just to marvel at my mother’s imagination and her exquisite handiwork.

I keep it close in a corner of an old bureau. And I keep it closer in a corner of my heart.

Crepe paper is fragile. But this most delicate work of art, a reminder of my mother’s love, has survived for all these years. So has my love for her.

Some things are one of a kind. This dress. And my mother.

Crepe paper dress

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St. Patrick’s Day and Secrets and Shamrocks

How is it possible that this was six years ago? My copies of Secrets and Shamrocks had just arrived. So exciting!

Book launch at Barnes and Noble, with friends from Nashville State.

A reader in Ireland.

On Saint Patrick’s Day, let Secrets and Shamrocks take you to Ireland with Jordan Mayfair, who always gets herself involved in a mystery!

“A visit to the verdant Irish countryside is marred by murder. The second in Gobbell’s travel series is filled with delightful descriptions of Ireland and offbeat characters…”Kirkus Review

An Unfinished Canvas is back!

It’s always exciting to open a box of books! An Unfinished Canvas has been out of print for a while now. People continue to ask about the story of the Janet March murder and the ten-year investigation that ended with justice for Janet. So glad it’s available again!

Read about the case and order here: An Unfinished Canvas

Two great deals!

For a limited time, my publisher is running a promo for Treachery in Tuscany ebook for just $1.99! Also, the just-released audiobook, Pursuit in Provence, is on sale at Chirp for an unbelievable price – $2.99! June seems to be the month for traveling. I hope you’ll follow Jordan Mayfair as she solves crime in France and Italy!

ebook available June 25-July 2 – One week only! – $1.99
Audiobook available from Chirp – Here’s a link to this deal! You can listen to a sample of the narration by Aimee Barrett.
https://www.chirpbooks.com/audiobooks/pursuit-in-provence-by-phyllis-gobbell